The Way of the Lord Jesus: John M. Finnis - About John Finnis

☯ Full Synopsis : "This volume of essays, though primarily designed for students of law, will also attract a wide audience among philosophers and those interested in political theory. Members of the Faculty of Law at Oxford have combined to explore such central topics as negligence and mens rea, ownership, possession, voluntary and involuntary acts, sovereignty, the rule of law, justiciability, motive, and the doctrine of precedent. These topics have hitherto usually been treated simply as one part of a comprehensive treatise on jurisprudence by a single author; readers will find their treatment in detail by a number of different writers both stimulating and original."Article| Anthony Gordon Guest| Statement ..."

Law and Legal Theory’ in AWB Simpson (ed), Oxford Essays in Jurisprudence ..

☯ Full Synopsis : "This volume of essays, though primarily designed for students of law, will also attract a wide audience among philosophers and those interested in political theory. Members of the Faculty of Law at Oxford have combined to explore such central topics as negligence and mens rea, ownership, possession, voluntary and involuntary acts, sovereignty, the rule of law, justiciability, motive, and the doctrine of precedent. These topics have hitherto usually been treated simply as one part of a comprehensive treatise on jurisprudence by a single author; readers will find their treatment in detail by a number of different writers both stimulating and original."Article| Anthony Gordon Guest| Statement ..."


Word In Action Ministry - Ecclesiastical Court of Justice

(in an essay published in Simpson’s collection of Oxford Essays in Jurisprudence), ..

In any case, I have been thinking this summer about what Dworkin calls the problem of "theoretical disagreement" in Law's Empire, prompted by the paper by my friend Scott Shapiro on the Hart/Dworkin debate in the new CUP volume on Dworkin edited by Arthur Ripstein. (I may write about Ripstein's introduction to that volume at a later date.) In reading around, I was led back to the old and well-known paper by Simpson on "The Common Law and Legal Theory," which appeared in the Oxford Essays in Jurisprudence, 2nd Series that he edited in 1973. The paper has been much cited, and I have a dim recollection of having read it in law school 20 odd years ago. In any case, I re-read it today.